Baby Rag Blanket

Makin’ blankets! I LOVE makin’ blankets! Baby blankets to be more specific. You may think that quilts would be super difficult and I won’t lie, some designs really are. However, there are a ton of different quilt tutorials out there for beginners like myself! So if you’re new to this sort of thing, don’t be intimidated, this is totally do-able.

For my baby shower I got SO many homemade baby blankets it was kind of overwhelming! I was SO grateful for all the love everyone showered us with but I just didn’t know when or how I was going to have the chance to use ALL of those blankets! So when my cousin announced her pregnancy I decided straight away that I wasn’t going to make her a baby blanket because I figured it would be the same case with her. But THEN I found this tutorial and I just couldn’t resist!

So I made a quick trip to JoAnn’s… lol, I couldn’t even type that with a straight face! Ok, seriously though, I went to JoAnn’s and 3 hours later I remembered I went there to get fabric for Karli’s baby blanket so I steered myself towards the fabric corner. I found 7 coordinating pastel flannel fabrics, plus one cotton fabric for the binding.

The fabric for the binding is not pictured here. Also I ended up not using the gray and mint polka-dot fabric. I just didn't feel like it really worked.

The fabric for the binding is not pictured here. Also I ended up not using the gray and mint polka-dot fabric. I just didn’t feel like it really worked.

So altogether, you should have 7 1/2 yard of coordinating flannel fabric, 2 yards of cotton batting and another 1/2 yard of matching fabric for the binding. Generally, the first thing I do when I start working with fabric is iron them. It just makes working with them a little easier.

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Once I have everything Ironed and laid out flat I cut my pieces. You will need 2 stripes of each fabric at 6″ wide and 2 of each at 3″.

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Now you are going to make some fabric sandwiches. Take a piece of 6″ flannel, lay it face down, place a 6″ of batting on top of it and place the other 6″ strip from the same fabric down face up. Sew a line right down the middle to secure these pieces. Repeat this process with the remaining strips of fabric. Once I had everything sewn together I laid out my fabrics on the floor to decide the most aesthetically appealing layout. I tried a few different options before I decided.

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Once you have decided on your layout you can start putting together your quilt. Start sewing the strips together with about a 1/8 seam allowance. You want all the strips to be sewn so that one side of the quilt is smooth and the other side has all the “seam allowances.” Once you have sewn it all together you want to cut along all of the “seams” so that they are very ragged. Be sure you don’t cut into the thread.

Now that everything is cut, you just need to place the binding. The tutorial that I worked from did not provide instructions for the binding. I did a little research and my grandmother recommended I use the Stitch in the Ditch binding method. I just looked it up on YouTube and used that method. This was my FIRST time ever adding binding and I know that it definitely had a plethora of obvious mistakes, but I am just SO excited that I did it period that I just don’t care!

Once you have completed the binding wash and dry your blanket. This will cause those little fabric snips that you created earlier to get really raggedy. Now You’re all done!

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I’m hoping after little miss Karli makes your grand debut maybe Amy will be kind enough to provide us of a picture with her and her lovely baby blanket!

Also I just want to say that I have used and continue to use EVERY SINGLE ONE of the baby blankets that have been gifted to Edythe and I am starting to be of the mindset that you can never have too many baby blankets or burp clothes.

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